Posts Tagged ‘Sho-Hondo Convention’

by James C. Stephens


July 18, 1973

Two days before the Monthly Leader’s meeting with Mr. Williams (July 10), I was on my way to take Ken Dilando to his music lesson and me to work, when I was pulled over by our friends in blue, the LAPD (Los Angeles Police Department). As I was sitting in the car and chanting under my breath, I was reflecting on how I was really chanting to take care of my old parking tickets, well then our friends came up and me me away to the Black and White sedan and shortly afterward took Ken and handcuffed him too. We were treated nicely until of course we got to the jail, where we were booked, fingerprinted, not told of our rights, and let into the tank. Strange, the guy that fingerprinted me, I had go to school with at James Monroe. Well as soon as we were in the tank we began chanting. We chanted from cell to cell to the bus, from Van Nuys to the County Jail.

At the County Jail it was pure bureaucratic bull we had to go through. I had notified my boss I was in jail (my dad was on vacation in Montana). We had to strip, shower, get sprayed, get our bodies inspected, x-rayed, blood tested, wait, wait, wait, eat, which wasn’t bad food, and wait for a cell. While we were waiting, I did alot of shakubuku. I shakubukued quite a few black dudes, one who chanted with me for about ten minutes, and another dude chanted with me who was strung out on heroine. I shakubukued my cell mate who was in for grand theft auto and burglary. It was a strange trip, and to make it through took a lot of daimoku. My cellmates thought I was crazy when I came in because I was so friendly and smiling, that’s what I was told by them after I told them I was a Buddhist and shakubukued them. They then understood and said, ‘I see, it’s your philosophy to be friendly, right?’

So, I taught them the chant, because my boss Ric Benson had bailed me out, which was really groovy of him. He also picked me up from jail at 12:30 at night. Pretty groovy.

Well, tommorrow 7/19, I go to court and see what happens.

Also I start my second job as a bus boy at Alphy’s for 2.40/hr. at 11:00-7:00.

I must go on Tozon. I made these determinations:

  1. To really have a strong, confidant, and seeking mind for President Ikeda.
  2. To play for President Ikeda in our Brass Band.
  3. To become a good son to my father.
  4. To have one YMD by Sho-hondo to stand up!!
  5. To chant a minimum of one and half hours/day to Sho-Hondo Convention.
  6. To play and march with true Yusohan Gakkai Spirit!!
  7. To recite Kaimoku Sho every day.
  8. To read Time and Newsweek weekly; to read a book on U.S. History; to study Buddhism daily.
Advertisements

by James C. Stephens


July 6, 1973

Only 99 days left to the convention it said at the Headquarters. Each day I hope to make a stronger determination and really build it in my life. Lately, I have been on a communication campaign with my assistant chapter chief Russ Dilando. One of my big problems has been communication. I report on things like a bureaucrat rather than as a human being. When I feel lousy I try to paint a rosy picture to my district chief, like, “I feel lousy, but I determine to change it!” Instead of telling him, straight like a common person, and getting to the root of the problem. That’s a big problem in our society. We may admit we have faults, but often it is just useless talk, when we don’t really try to get down and change those problems through action.

Mike Lisagor my chikabucho (district chief) said that many of my Sr. leaders said that when I find somebody to communicate with (a Sr. Leader) then my practice will really change.

I need to really be able to take guidance no matter how harsh it is and translate it into action. That is one of my major obstacles in handling or being able to handle more responsibility.

Another problem I am trying to tackle more consistantly is the problem of on-shitsu. I am chanting to the Gohonzon to be able to really learn from other people and rather than compete with others to learn that the battle is really against myself.

Right now I only have $100.00 down on Tozon and not to say the least I am worried about it. However, the job I got as an administrative coordinator is not bad. I really chanted for a well paying job and for a job that I could put myself to a definite challenge. Well, I got it. I type invoices, I file, I answer phones, talk to clients, work with bank accounts and truthfully am under some pressure. I am really happy for the challenge. It pays $2.75 an hour which is 50 cents an hour more than I ever made before. We are a service company which ships commercials for radio and T.V. and has other clients which we handle their business of film distribution throughout the U.S. It is definitely a good experience.

My obstacle are showing for Sho-hondo Convention for sure. For the last week I have had a touch of the flu, and not too good of a diet to fight it. I have been trying to get things turned on at my new apartment for the last week and so things and money have been tight. I got the electricity turned on last week and the phone this week.

Red VWMy car–wow. It’s a sore subject. I rarely am not seen running alongside it and then hopping in and popping the clutch to start it.

Well, it’s time to get back to work. I just shakubukued the waitress Maria–she’s from Columbia. Bye.


I was working two jobs. Before I got the job at Benson-Jones I got a graveyard shift job busing tables and doing dishes at Alphy’s Coffee Shop. I was determined to save up money for the Sho-Hondo Convention in Japan. I would go to evening meetings from 7-8:30PM, volunteer at the warehouse until 10:00PM, drive home, take a short nap, go to work busing tables and doing dishes at a 24 hour coffee shop, go home, take a short nap, shower, do my morning Gongyo (prayers), drive to Toluca Lake to work at my Administrative job, take a nap during lunch, work. Repeat.

by James C. Stephens


April 20, 1973

It’s so hard to make the first mark on a canvas, but I feel it’s almost 100 times more difficult to start one’s own diary.

A few days ago I bought this book for a reason. I had started another diary, but it was sort of spotty. This one I resolve to keep up everyday.  On the back cover I will make a 1 million daimoku chart.

With this one million daimoku I resolve to overcome 1) my uptight nature and change it into Ichinen for President Ikeda and Kosenrufu; 2) To develop concrete goals in my life; 3) To develop a seeking spirit to put President Ikeda’s guidance into practice in the depth’s of my life; 4) To help develop 3 strong YMD leaders by Sho-Hondo Convention 1973; 5) To really direct my life through the Gohonzon to build a strong foundation in order to be strong enough to receive guidances from President Ikeda in the future; 6) Become physically strong; 7) Chant strong rhythmical daimoku; 8) To have super advancement on my bass clarinet and unity in the Brass Band by Sho-Hondo convention; 9) To really learn the spirit of Sta-funi; of following; 10) To be a happy human being able to enjoy things and encourage others.


 

Sta-funi: Oneness of Master and Disciple.