by James C. Stephens


July 16, 1977

July 16, 1260 was the date Nichiren Daishonin remonstrated with the Kamakura regime through his treatise entitled, The Rissho Ankoku Ron. July 16, 1975 I was in Hawaii for the Pre-Bicentennial Convention. That morning we did Gongyo with Mr. Williams and heard a lecture on the Rissho Ankoku Ron.

In my last entry you remember I maintained that I would not seek a mate until I first struggled with the innate darkness in my life. In other words, I felt what Mr. Williams said, don’t chase happiness, let it chase you, made sense for the first time in my practice. Guess what happened after I sincerely made this commitment?

File1331

Liz Lascar and her Uncle Mose.

 

Well, there is a girl who loaned me the first volume of the Human Revolution to xerox and I kept neglecting to return it. I was trying to follow guidance of Mr. Black had given me to read Vol. I of the Human Revolution. Finally, I decided I had better return it to this persistent joshibu (young women’s division) before I caused some problems. So on June 14, 1977 at 11:00 PM I decided to return it to Liz Lascar. I had never really noticed Liz except in passing. She invited me in for coffee.

Once while I was sick I remember having a really nice conversation with her about a variety of things. She later told me she had never opened up about these things to anyone else before. She invited me to a picnic on a Sunday, but I declined as I was still a bit sick. The long and short of it is I think I love her. I tell you its difficult for me to say that but it’s not an intellectual head trip like before, but damn I’m afraid I am in love. I tried to avoid these things, but I hope and feel I’ve found my partner. The chemistry, the time, and all those crazy things people said about your soul mate seem to be happening to me. Today she left for Japan to see the Dai Gohonzon. I even sort of miss her. I try not to, but I am feeling we are together-sort of Abutsu-bo and Sennichi*. I sent a letter to the Dai Gohonzon with Liz. I am going through major changes believe me. But I look on them as a tool to develop my faith. I really do, and to develop my understanding of my life.

We also made a decision beside waiting a year and see what happens between us, that we would try living together two months to see if we are compatible. I will be moving in shortly. We talked it over with her chapter chief Don Mentzer and he saw nothing wrong with the arrangement.

She should be at about 7:30 p.m. in Japan, Sunday. I hope she is safe and happy.

Good nite Liz.

 


 

Abutsu-bo and Sennichi*: “Also known as Abutsu-bō Nittoku. A lay follower of Nichiren who lived in the province of Sado, an island in the Sea of Japan. His secular name was Endō Tamemori. Tradition has it that Abutsu-bō was once a samurai who served the Retired Emperor Juntoku in Kyoto and accompanied him to Sado Island when Juntoku was banished there after an abortive attempt by the imperial court to overthrow the Kamakura shogunate in what is known as the Jōkyū Disturbance of 1221. According to recent studies, however, it seems more probable that he was actually a native of Sado. When Nichiren was exiled to Sado in late 1271, Abutsu-bō, an ardent Pure Land believer, visited him at Tsukahara to confront him in debate. Bested in debate by Nichiren, who refuted the Pure Land teachings, Abutsu-bō converted to Nichiren’s teachings together with his wife, the lay nun Sennichi. The couple sincerely assisted Nichiren during his exile, supplying him with food and other necessities for more than two years until he was pardoned and left the island in 1274. After Nichiren went to live at the foot of Mount Minobu, Abutsu-bō, despite his advanced age, made at least three journeys to visit him with offerings. Abutsu-bō is said to have died on the twenty-first day of the third month, 1279, at age ninety-one. In 1279 his son, Tōkurō Moritsuna, traveled to Minobu with Abutsu-bō’s ashes and there laid them to rest. Moritsuna continued to uphold Nichiren’s teachings, and his grandson, known by his priestly name Nyojaku Nichiman, went as a child to Fuji where he became a disciple of Nikkō, Nichiren’s immediate successor.”

 

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